Posts

Posts Shortcodes

You can show the posts with Porto Blog, Porto Recent Posts shortcodes.


Recent

Combinar meditação com exercício físico melhora a saúde do cérebro

Já é bem conhecido que uma forma eficaz de levar os benefícios da meditação e de mindfulness para nosso dia... Read More

Here’s How Mindfulness Affect Your Body, Especially In Times Of Stress, According To Experts

How many times has it been suggested that you start a mindfulness practice? For me, I’d say I’m cresting... Read More

Meditação: O que a ciência diz sobre as práticas como o Mindfulness

Pesquisadores analisam possíveis efeitos e limitações da prática da atenção plena. Porém, são necessárias mais e melhores pesquisas para... Read More

Mindfulness in schools makes for happier, confident children

WELLNESS Many children in South Africa are born into harsh conditions such as poverty, domestic violence and poor-quality schooling, leaving... Read More

Benefícios da prática de mindfulness para a saúde, educação e organizações

Praticar mindfulness regularmente em nosso dia a dia nos traz benefícios concretos e  atestados pelas pesquisas científicas, que não... Read More

El ‘mindfulness’, ¿una moda o un estilo de vida?

Esta práctica está cada día más asentada en la población y abarca el ámbito laboral, educativo y deportivo, entre... Read More

COMO MINDFULNESS PODE AJUDAR PESSOAS COM ANSIEDADE

Historicamente, a ansiedade foi um dos primeiros transtornos abordados pelos programas de mindfulness, mais especificamente pelo MBSR (Mindfulness-Based Stress... Read More

El ‘mindfulness’ alivia los síntomas de la menopausia

El ‘mindfulness’ implica enfocar la atención en el momento presente y observar los pensamientos y sensaciones sin juzgar Las técnicas... Read More


Timeline

março 2019

Combinar meditação com exercício físico melhora a saúde do cérebro

Já é bem conhecido que uma forma eficaz de levar os benefícios da meditação e de mindfulness para nosso dia a dia é através da atividade física, ou seja, praticando exercícios com atenção plena ou consciência nas sensações corporais e nos movimentos em si. Assim, o próprio exercício físico vira uma forma de “meditação”.

Alguns estudos já demonstraram que isso é possível, ou seja, que os exercícios físicos regulares também melhoram os níveis de mindfulness desde que feitos com atenção plena (evitando-se as distrações durante o exercício, como por exemplo, ler ou
conversar), melhorando, além do condicionamento físico, a concentração e a saúde mental.

A novidade é que nos últimos anos também tem sido testado cientificamente a inclusão de meditação e exercício na mesma sessão, combinando na sequência de um mesmo treinamento, práticas de meditação do tipo mindfulness (conheça algumas técnicas de
mindfulness clicando aqui) e exercícios físicos aeróbios. Em geral, começa-se com 30 minutos de meditação, e se finaliza com mais 30 minutos de atividade física de intensidade moderada, num treino de 1 hora no total.

Os resultados são muito positivos, inclusive para o cérebro: melhora da aptidão física, menos sintomas de ansiedade e depressão, menos ruminação mental (aqueles pensamentos repetitivos e autodepreciativos), melhor manejo de traumas psicológicos, e
respostas neuropsicológicas mais saudáveis (medidas por testes objetivos). O interessante é que esses resultados foram superiores quando comparados com praticar apenas meditação ou apenas atividade física.

Assim, da próxima vez que praticar exercícios ou esportes, lembre-se da possibilidade de levar mindfulness às essas atividades, ou melhor, de praticar as duas coisas de forma integrada, ampliando seus resultados.

Vamos praticar?

Referências:

– Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723891

– MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26836414

Para saber mais:

www.mindfulnessbrasil.com (Mente Aberta – Centro Brasileiro de Mindfulness e Promoção da Saúde – UNIFESP)

www.goamra.org (American Mindfulness Research Association, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

www.umassmed.edu/cfm (Centro de Meditação “Mindfulness” na Medicina, Universidade de Massachusetts, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

 

 

Fonte – Dr. Marcelo Demarzo

Here’s How Mindfulness Affect Your Body, Especially In Times Of Stress, According To Experts

How many times has it been suggested that you start a mindfulness practice? For me, I’d say I’m cresting a million times, but that doesn’t mean I’ve actually dipped my feet into the practice just yet. Maybe you’re sick of hearing about it yourself, but when you really think about how mindfulness can affect your body, it’s pretty incredible. So even if you consider yourself to be a bit of a skeptic about these things, hear me out, because experts say the practice does live up to the hype.

When people talk about mindfulness, the focus is usually on things like quieting your mind, relieving stress, and turning negative thoughts into positive ones. And yes, mindfulness can help you achieve those things, but according to spiritual teacher and meditation guide, Biet Simkin, the practice is also a way to recognize what she calls “the ultimate truth.” She tells Elite Daily in an email, “[Mindfulness] makes you remember who you are and what your purpose is on this planet.” In other words, practicing mindfulness is essentially a way to practice being your most natural, authentic self, without any distractions or influences from the outside world. It helps you get in touch with who you really are.

If the skeptic in you has suddenly grown to be a bit more curious, here are a few other fascinating ways mindfulness affects your body.

IT CAN HELP REDUCE ANXIETY IN REAL TIME

“Mindfulness is one of the best tools for eliminating real-time anxiety and physical stress responses,” Kristen Rice, a behavioral health coach, meditation teacher, and energy healer, tells Elite Daily. “Anxiety exists when our fight-or-flight stress response is triggered when thinking about the past or the future.”

Most of the time, Rice explains, these perceived “threats” that your body is picking up on when you feel anxious aren’t actually real, or at least, they don’t warrant such an intense physiological response. So really, that response only serves to make you feel more overwhelmed, rather than actually solve anything.

That’s where mindfulness comes in, according to Rice. “When paired with mindful breathing, the physical results are extremely powerful because, with slow, deep breathing into the belly, you experience biofeedback between the mind and body,” she explains. “Your breath slows, and as a result, your body communicates back to the parasympathetic nervous system that you are safe, allowing both your mind and body to calm, slow, and turn off the alarms.”

MINDFULNESS CAN CURTAIL YOUR BODY’S STRESS RESPONSE

One of the major benefits of meditation is stress management, yoga teacher, author, and speaker Jodi Ashbrook, tells Elite Daily. She explains that your brain releases the hormone cortisol when you feel really overwhelmed with stress, and mindfulness can help to manage that reaction.

“Over 18,000 studies have supported the use of meditation as one of the best daily habits for improving mental health and reducing cortisol to manage stress,” Ashbrook explains. And as a result, she adds, stress management can contribute to other physical and mental health benefits, like better sleep, better focus, etc.

IT ALLOWS YOU TO CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONAL RESPONSES

According to licensed clinical social worker Melissa Ifill, mindfulness can help you gain a better understanding of what you’re thinking, what you’re feeling, and how you’re behaving, which in turn allows for a greater ability to manage emotions and reactions overall.

“This heightened awareness gives us the tools to be able to address these patterns of thought, feelings, and behaviors in ways that can positively impact our mood and our functioning,” she tells Elite Daily.

PRACTICING MINDFULNESS CAN ACTUALLY LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

“Practicing mindfulness balances the autonomic nervous system, which naturally lowers blood pressure,” Dr. Dora Wolfe, a licensed clinical psychologist and clinical director of Wolfe Behavioral Health, tells Elite Daily.

And indeed, a scientific review published in the International Journal of Hypertension showed that practicing transcendental meditation is linked to reduced blood pressure in people who have hypertension. Not a bad reason to give it a try, right?

IT ALSO CALMS YOUR HEART RATE

You know when you get upset about something and your heart feels like it’s going to rapidly rocket out of your chest? It’s one of the worst feelings, for sure, but according to Lillian Daniels, wellness expert and founder of The Happy Knee, practicing mindfulness might be able to help, as it can calm and slow your heart rate.

“[Mindful] practices, such as breathing exercises, actually can calm your heart rate, even in a highly stressful situation,” Daniels tells Elite Daily.

MINDFULNESS MIGHT HELP TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BODY IMAGE

Anything that encourages you to think more positively about your body is worth trying, IMO, and science says mindfulness can help with this, too. In a recent study, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in England recruited 646 British adults between 18 and 76 years old and asked them to complete a handful of different questionnaires, one of which focused on their bodily awareness, while the rest focused on things like body image, body appreciation, and self-consciousness.

The results, which have been published in the academic journal Body Image, revealed a connection between a person’s ability to read their body’s internal signals (such as hunger or emotional discomfort) and their body image. Basically, the researchers found that the greater the person’s bodily awareness, the more positive they felt overall about their body. And while the study’s press release noted that more research is needed to confirm these findings, lead study author Jenny Todd said in a statement, “This could have implications for promoting positive body image, for example modifying interoceptive awareness through mindfulness-based practices.”

 

Fonte – Elite Daily

 


Grid

Combinar meditação com exercício físico melhora a saúde do cérebro

Já é bem conhecido que uma forma eficaz de levar os benefícios da meditação e de mindfulness para nosso dia a dia é através da atividade física, ou seja, praticando exercícios com atenção plena ou consciência nas sensações corporais e nos movimentos em si. Assim, o próprio exercício físico vira uma forma de “meditação”.

Alguns estudos já demonstraram que isso é possível, ou seja, que os exercícios físicos regulares também melhoram os níveis de mindfulness desde que feitos com atenção plena (evitando-se as distrações durante o exercício, como por exemplo, ler ou
conversar), melhorando, além do condicionamento físico, a concentração e a saúde mental.

A novidade é que nos últimos anos também tem sido testado cientificamente a inclusão de meditação e exercício na mesma sessão, combinando na sequência de um mesmo treinamento, práticas de meditação do tipo mindfulness (conheça algumas técnicas de
mindfulness clicando aqui) e exercícios físicos aeróbios. Em geral, começa-se com 30 minutos de meditação, e se finaliza com mais 30 minutos de atividade física de intensidade moderada, num treino de 1 hora no total.

Os resultados são muito positivos, inclusive para o cérebro: melhora da aptidão física, menos sintomas de ansiedade e depressão, menos ruminação mental (aqueles pensamentos repetitivos e autodepreciativos), melhor manejo de traumas psicológicos, e
respostas neuropsicológicas mais saudáveis (medidas por testes objetivos). O interessante é que esses resultados foram superiores quando comparados com praticar apenas meditação ou apenas atividade física.

Assim, da próxima vez que praticar exercícios ou esportes, lembre-se da possibilidade de levar mindfulness às essas atividades, ou melhor, de praticar as duas coisas de forma integrada, ampliando seus resultados.

Vamos praticar?

Referências:

– Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723891

– MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26836414

Para saber mais:

www.mindfulnessbrasil.com (Mente Aberta – Centro Brasileiro de Mindfulness e Promoção da Saúde – UNIFESP)

www.goamra.org (American Mindfulness Research Association, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

www.umassmed.edu/cfm (Centro de Meditação “Mindfulness” na Medicina, Universidade de Massachusetts, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

 

 

Fonte – Dr. Marcelo Demarzo

Here’s How Mindfulness Affect Your Body, Especially In Times Of Stress, According To Experts

How many times has it been suggested that you start a mindfulness practice? For me, I’d say I’m cresting a million times, but that doesn’t mean I’ve actually dipped my feet into the practice just yet. Maybe you’re sick of hearing about it yourself, but when you really think about how mindfulness can affect your body, it’s pretty incredible. So even if you consider yourself to be a bit of a skeptic about these things, hear me out, because experts say the practice does live up to the hype.

When people talk about mindfulness, the focus is usually on things like quieting your mind, relieving stress, and turning negative thoughts into positive ones. And yes, mindfulness can help you achieve those things, but according to spiritual teacher and meditation guide, Biet Simkin, the practice is also a way to recognize what she calls “the ultimate truth.” She tells Elite Daily in an email, “[Mindfulness] makes you remember who you are and what your purpose is on this planet.” In other words, practicing mindfulness is essentially a way to practice being your most natural, authentic self, without any distractions or influences from the outside world. It helps you get in touch with who you really are.

If the skeptic in you has suddenly grown to be a bit more curious, here are a few other fascinating ways mindfulness affects your body.

IT CAN HELP REDUCE ANXIETY IN REAL TIME

“Mindfulness is one of the best tools for eliminating real-time anxiety and physical stress responses,” Kristen Rice, a behavioral health coach, meditation teacher, and energy healer, tells Elite Daily. “Anxiety exists when our fight-or-flight stress response is triggered when thinking about the past or the future.”

Most of the time, Rice explains, these perceived “threats” that your body is picking up on when you feel anxious aren’t actually real, or at least, they don’t warrant such an intense physiological response. So really, that response only serves to make you feel more overwhelmed, rather than actually solve anything.

That’s where mindfulness comes in, according to Rice. “When paired with mindful breathing, the physical results are extremely powerful because, with slow, deep breathing into the belly, you experience biofeedback between the mind and body,” she explains. “Your breath slows, and as a result, your body communicates back to the parasympathetic nervous system that you are safe, allowing both your mind and body to calm, slow, and turn off the alarms.”

MINDFULNESS CAN CURTAIL YOUR BODY’S STRESS RESPONSE

One of the major benefits of meditation is stress management, yoga teacher, author, and speaker Jodi Ashbrook, tells Elite Daily. She explains that your brain releases the hormone cortisol when you feel really overwhelmed with stress, and mindfulness can help to manage that reaction.

“Over 18,000 studies have supported the use of meditation as one of the best daily habits for improving mental health and reducing cortisol to manage stress,” Ashbrook explains. And as a result, she adds, stress management can contribute to other physical and mental health benefits, like better sleep, better focus, etc.

IT ALLOWS YOU TO CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONAL RESPONSES

According to licensed clinical social worker Melissa Ifill, mindfulness can help you gain a better understanding of what you’re thinking, what you’re feeling, and how you’re behaving, which in turn allows for a greater ability to manage emotions and reactions overall.

“This heightened awareness gives us the tools to be able to address these patterns of thought, feelings, and behaviors in ways that can positively impact our mood and our functioning,” she tells Elite Daily.

PRACTICING MINDFULNESS CAN ACTUALLY LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

“Practicing mindfulness balances the autonomic nervous system, which naturally lowers blood pressure,” Dr. Dora Wolfe, a licensed clinical psychologist and clinical director of Wolfe Behavioral Health, tells Elite Daily.

And indeed, a scientific review published in the International Journal of Hypertension showed that practicing transcendental meditation is linked to reduced blood pressure in people who have hypertension. Not a bad reason to give it a try, right?

IT ALSO CALMS YOUR HEART RATE

You know when you get upset about something and your heart feels like it’s going to rapidly rocket out of your chest? It’s one of the worst feelings, for sure, but according to Lillian Daniels, wellness expert and founder of The Happy Knee, practicing mindfulness might be able to help, as it can calm and slow your heart rate.

“[Mindful] practices, such as breathing exercises, actually can calm your heart rate, even in a highly stressful situation,” Daniels tells Elite Daily.

MINDFULNESS MIGHT HELP TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BODY IMAGE

Anything that encourages you to think more positively about your body is worth trying, IMO, and science says mindfulness can help with this, too. In a recent study, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in England recruited 646 British adults between 18 and 76 years old and asked them to complete a handful of different questionnaires, one of which focused on their bodily awareness, while the rest focused on things like body image, body appreciation, and self-consciousness.

The results, which have been published in the academic journal Body Image, revealed a connection between a person’s ability to read their body’s internal signals (such as hunger or emotional discomfort) and their body image. Basically, the researchers found that the greater the person’s bodily awareness, the more positive they felt overall about their body. And while the study’s press release noted that more research is needed to confirm these findings, lead study author Jenny Todd said in a statement, “This could have implications for promoting positive body image, for example modifying interoceptive awareness through mindfulness-based practices.”

 

Fonte – Elite Daily

 

Meditação: O que a ciência diz sobre as práticas como o Mindfulness

Pesquisadores analisam possíveis efeitos e limitações da prática da atenção plena. Porém, são necessárias mais e melhores pesquisas para determinar os reais efeitos desses programas.

As práticas meditativas são objeto de atenção de diferentes vertentes espirituais e religiosas, do vipassana budista à kaballah judaica. Em 2017, dados de questionários da Pesquisa Nacional de Saúde dos EUA indicaram que entre 2012 e 2017 triplicou o número de adultos que praticaram meditação.

Tem crescido também o interesse de cientistas sobre os efeitos da prática para a saúde mental. As publicações em revistas científicas sobre mindfulness (ou “consciência plena”, forma de meditação que prega a atenção total ao aqui e agora), cresceram de 12, em 2000, para 624, em 2015, segundo dados da Associação Americana de Pesquisa em mindfulness. No Reino Unido, um protocolo que une mindfulness à terapia cognitiva comportamental é uma das indicações terapêuticas para a depressão recorrente preconizada nas diretrizes oficiais de saúde .

Edilaine Gherardi-Donato, professora associada e chefe do Departamento de Enfermagem Psiquiátrica e Ciências Humanas da Escola de Enfermagem de Ribeirão Preto (USP), explica que “meditação é um exercício de atenção, concentração e presença”. “Para meditar é preciso intencionalmente focar a atenção em algo, seja interno ou externo. É um exercício do estado de atenção plena”.

A ciência por trás do silêncio

Camila Vorkapic, mestre em psiquiatria e saúde mental e doutora em psicologia pela UFRJ estuda a fisiologia da prática da meditação. Ela explica que o córtex pré-frontal do cérebro tem três conjuntos de estruturas cognitivas que podem ser ativadas: a rede default, em ação quando estamos “viajando”; a de saliência, ativada quando reorientamos o pensamento para uma ação; e a rede central executiva, ativada quando estamos, de fato, executando uma tarefa.

O cérebro alterna entre essas funções continuamente. “O que se observa com a prática de mindfulness é uma redução nas atividades da rede default: fica-se mais atento e presente. Ao mesmo tempo há redução – inclusive estrutural – na área das amígdalas, responsáveis por emoções como medo e ansiedade. Pessoas que meditam têm as amígdalas menos ativadas”, explica.

Tomografias e ressonâncias também mostram redução da atenção voltada a estímulos externos e aumento da atenção sustentada interna. Aumentam também a produção de neurotransmissores como o GABA (ou ácido gama-aminobutírico, conhecido como o “calmante natural do cérebro”) e dos níveis de dopamina (neurotransmissor relacionado ao prazer), serotonina (ligada a regulação do humor) e das endorfinas, os analgésicos naturais do corpo.

“A alteração cerebral mais significativa, mostrada em um estudo de Harvard, foi o aumento da espessura da massa cinzenta, ou seja, aumento no número de neurônios de determinadas áreas do cérebro”, conta a pesquisadora.

Marcelo Demarzo é doutor em patologia pela USP e professor da Escola Paulista de Medicina (Unifesp). Ele defende a prática como tratamento complementar de condições como ansiedade, depressão e dores crônicas. “As principais técnicas para o desenvolvimento da atenção plena são exercícios atencionais derivados de algumas práticas meditativas que usam o próprio corpo (respiração, sensações corporais) como âncoras para o treinamento da atenção”, relata. “Podemos mapear os benefícios de mindfulness de várias maneiras: por escalas psicológicas, avaliações sanguíneas, avaliações neurobiológicas ou cerebrais e por exames de ressonância magnética funcional”.

Segundo o pesquisador, programas de mindfulness promovem mudanças na estrutura cerebral devido à capacidade neuroplástica do cérebro – efeito captado pelos exames de neuroimagem. “Algumas áreas cerebrais são mais beneficiadas pela prática, como o hipocampo, hipotálamo e córtex pré-frontal. São áreas relacionadas à memória, à tomada de consciência do corpo em relação ao espaço (propriocepção), à tomada de decisões, ao raciocínio crítico, ou seja, às funções cognitivas em geral”.

“Meditar é saudável, mas não é uma panaceia”

Apesar dos esforços recentes, a ciência engatinha para comprovar benefícios da meditação sobre o cérebro. “Muitos estudos não têm um grupo controle, uma randomização, uma boa descrição da técnica utilizada ou de como ela foi ensinada aos pacientes/voluntários. Estatística e a apresentação dos dados de forma adequada também são fundamentais”, ressalta Elisa Kozasa, pesquisadora do Instituto do Cérebro do Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein e também uma das referências sobre o tema no Brasil.

Para analisar os efeitos de estados meditativos sobre o cérebro, ressalta Kozasa, exames de imagem como ressonâncias magnéticas funcionais são importantes. Mas a forma como são conduzidos, também. “Não é exatamente o que as imagens nos dizem, mas como elas foram adquiridas, processadas, analisadas e interpretadas. Trata-se de um processo complexo que envolve uma equipe multidisciplinar de áreas diversas tais como a física, a computação e a neurorradiologia”, ressalta.

Um estudo de 2015 da universidade americana John Hopkins realizou revisão sistemática e meta-análise de 17.801 citações e 47 testes com 3320 participantes sobre programas de meditação para redução de estresse e promoção de bem-estar. Concluiu que programas de mindfulness de oito semanas têm evidências moderadas de auxílio na redução da ansiedade, depressão e dor. As evidências de que esses protocolos auxiliem na redução de estresse e qualidade de vida em termos de saúde mental foram consideradas baixas. Além disso, foi encontrada baixa ou nenhuma evidência de efeito sobre o nível de atenção, humor, uso de substâncias, alimentação ou sono.

Os pesquisadores também afirmam não terem encontrado evidências de que programas de meditação sejam mais eficientes do que outros tratamentos ativos para os quadros citados – como medicação, exercícios e terapias comportamentais. Assim, a meditação aparece mais como uma aliada do que um tratamento por si só. No entanto, os pesquisadores concluem o estudo alertando: os dados são basicamente inconclusivos. São necessárias mais e melhores pesquisas para determinar os reais efeitos desses programas na melhora da saúde.

Outra pesquisa, uma meta-análise conduzida em 2007 por pesquisadores da Universidade de Alberta (Canadá) e baseada em 813 estudos, chegou à conclusão de que a maioria das pesquisas conduzidas no estudo da meditação até então possuíam problemas metodológicos ou de apresentação de resultados. “Muitas incertezas cercam as práticas de meditação”, afirma o estudo. “Pesquisas científicas sobre a meditação não parecem ter uma perspectiva teórica comum e são caracterizadas por baixa qualidade metodológica. Conclusões mais firmes sobre os efeitos da meditação na saúde não podem ser obtidas baseadas nas evidências disponíveis (no estudo). Pesquisas futuras sobre práticas meditativas devem ser rigorosas em seu desenho, execução, análise e divulgação de resultados”, conclui.

Apesar de limitações metodológicas, outras pesquisas recentes indicam relação direta entre frequência de práticas meditativas e maiores níveis de consciência plena, autocompaixão e felicidade. É o caso de estudo de Demarzo publicado em 2016, que também observou como mindfulness e autocompaixão podem mediar a relação entre meditação e felicidade. Outros estudos indicam eficácia da meditação na redução da pressão arterial, síndrome do intestino irritável, ansiedade e depressão.

“Entre os achados, destacam-se os efeitos de redução dos níveis de cortisol, que impactam na qualidade do sono, no processo de envelhecimento celular, na resposta imunológica, nos processos inflamatórios e na estrutura do tecido cerebral. Em populações clínicas, existem benefícios reportados por estudos que introduziram a prática a pessoas com dor aguda e crônica, hipertensão, diabetes tipo 2, síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida e portadores do vírus da imunodeficiência humana (HIV) e abuso de drogas”, relata a professora Gherardi-Donato, da Escola de Enfermagem da USP.

Para Kozasa, é importante entender as limitações da prática para utilizá-la adequadamente. “É importante compreender que meditar pode ajudar a reduzir o estresse, problemas cardiovasculares como a hipertensão, além de ser um bom recurso para lidar com sintomas de ansiedade e depressão. Porém, existem outras práticas contemplativas que se utilizam não apenas da quietude da mente e do corpo, mas de recursos corporais – como ioga e tai chi. Pessoalmente, eu incluiria atividades como o surfe também como uma prática contemplativa, quando fora do contexto competitivo”, indica.

“Meditar é saudável, mas não é uma panaceia. É importante entender a importância de um estilo de vida saudável que envolve nutrição, buscar um ambiente ou entorno em que seja possível um contato com a natureza com alguma regularidade, além de exercícios físicos e o cultivo de relações saudáveis”, recomenda.  “Não falamos em cura, mas em melhor manejo dos problemas – o que pode prevenir novos quadros de ansiedade ou depressão, por exemplo”, corrobora Demarzo.

Foco empresarial

Há também estudos sobre os benefícios de mindfulness em outras áreas da sociedade, como na educação de crianças e adolescentes e no mundo corporativo. Rogério Calia é professor do curso de administração da USP em Ribeirão Preto e estuda as aplicações da prática em ciências organizacionais.

O professor relembra iniciativa do parlamento britânico que contratou pesquisadores em mindfulness da Universidade de Oxford para oferecer cursos da prática a parlamentares de diversos partidos. Também foi organizada, pelo parlamento, uma iniciativa para compilar pesquisas sobre o assunto que possam inspirar políticas públicas em educação, saúde, sistema carcerário e ambiente de trabalho. Entre as recomendações do documento, estão a promoção de programas de mindfulness no setor público, o estímulo a projetos de pesquisa na área e a implementação de terapia cognitiva aliada ao mindfulness para tratamento de depressão recorrente entre a população carcerária.

No ambiente de trabalho, o mindfulness é estudado como uma ferramenta para impulsionar desempenho e qualidade de vida. “O mindfulness fortalece a qualidade da atenção, que fortalece o cognitivo, o emocional e o comportamental – e isso, por sua vez, melhora o desempenho e as relações no trabalho”, explica Calia.

O interesse tem crescido tanto que grandes corporações têm seus próprios programas – é o caso do programa Search Inside Yourself (busque dentro de você) do Google, criado em 2007 por experts em mindfulness, neurociência e inteligência emocional como um treinamento interno para os funcionários – e hoje disponível em mais de 30 países.

 

 

 

Fonte – Com Ciência


Medium

Combinar meditação com exercício físico melhora a saúde do cérebro

Já é bem conhecido que uma forma eficaz de levar os benefícios da meditação e de mindfulness para nosso dia a dia é através da atividade física, ou seja, praticando exercícios com atenção plena ou consciência nas sensações corporais e nos movimentos em si. Assim, o próprio exercício físico vira uma forma de “meditação”.

Alguns estudos já demonstraram que isso é possível, ou seja, que os exercícios físicos regulares também melhoram os níveis de mindfulness desde que feitos com atenção plena (evitando-se as distrações durante o exercício, como por exemplo, ler ou
conversar), melhorando, além do condicionamento físico, a concentração e a saúde mental.

A novidade é que nos últimos anos também tem sido testado cientificamente a inclusão de meditação e exercício na mesma sessão, combinando na sequência de um mesmo treinamento, práticas de meditação do tipo mindfulness (conheça algumas técnicas de
mindfulness clicando aqui) e exercícios físicos aeróbios. Em geral, começa-se com 30 minutos de meditação, e se finaliza com mais 30 minutos de atividade física de intensidade moderada, num treino de 1 hora no total.

Os resultados são muito positivos, inclusive para o cérebro: melhora da aptidão física, menos sintomas de ansiedade e depressão, menos ruminação mental (aqueles pensamentos repetitivos e autodepreciativos), melhor manejo de traumas psicológicos, e
respostas neuropsicológicas mais saudáveis (medidas por testes objetivos). O interessante é que esses resultados foram superiores quando comparados com praticar apenas meditação ou apenas atividade física.

Assim, da próxima vez que praticar exercícios ou esportes, lembre-se da possibilidade de levar mindfulness às essas atividades, ou melhor, de praticar as duas coisas de forma integrada, ampliando seus resultados.

Vamos praticar?

Referências:

– Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723891

– MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26836414

Para saber mais:

www.mindfulnessbrasil.com (Mente Aberta – Centro Brasileiro de Mindfulness e Promoção da Saúde – UNIFESP)

www.goamra.org (American Mindfulness Research Association, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

www.umassmed.edu/cfm (Centro de Meditação “Mindfulness” na Medicina, Universidade de Massachusetts, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

 

 

Fonte – Dr. Marcelo Demarzo

Read more...

Here’s How Mindfulness Affect Your Body, Especially In Times Of Stress, According To Experts

How many times has it been suggested that you start a mindfulness practice? For me, I’d say I’m cresting a million times, but that doesn’t mean I’ve actually dipped my feet into the practice just yet. Maybe you’re sick of hearing about it yourself, but when you really think about how mindfulness can affect your body, it’s pretty incredible. So even if you consider yourself to be a bit of a skeptic about these things, hear me out, because experts say the practice does live up to the hype.

When people talk about mindfulness, the focus is usually on things like quieting your mind, relieving stress, and turning negative thoughts into positive ones. And yes, mindfulness can help you achieve those things, but according to spiritual teacher and meditation guide, Biet Simkin, the practice is also a way to recognize what she calls “the ultimate truth.” She tells Elite Daily in an email, “[Mindfulness] makes you remember who you are and what your purpose is on this planet.” In other words, practicing mindfulness is essentially a way to practice being your most natural, authentic self, without any distractions or influences from the outside world. It helps you get in touch with who you really are.

If the skeptic in you has suddenly grown to be a bit more curious, here are a few other fascinating ways mindfulness affects your body.

IT CAN HELP REDUCE ANXIETY IN REAL TIME

“Mindfulness is one of the best tools for eliminating real-time anxiety and physical stress responses,” Kristen Rice, a behavioral health coach, meditation teacher, and energy healer, tells Elite Daily. “Anxiety exists when our fight-or-flight stress response is triggered when thinking about the past or the future.”

Most of the time, Rice explains, these perceived “threats” that your body is picking up on when you feel anxious aren’t actually real, or at least, they don’t warrant such an intense physiological response. So really, that response only serves to make you feel more overwhelmed, rather than actually solve anything.

That’s where mindfulness comes in, according to Rice. “When paired with mindful breathing, the physical results are extremely powerful because, with slow, deep breathing into the belly, you experience biofeedback between the mind and body,” she explains. “Your breath slows, and as a result, your body communicates back to the parasympathetic nervous system that you are safe, allowing both your mind and body to calm, slow, and turn off the alarms.”

MINDFULNESS CAN CURTAIL YOUR BODY’S STRESS RESPONSE

One of the major benefits of meditation is stress management, yoga teacher, author, and speaker Jodi Ashbrook, tells Elite Daily. She explains that your brain releases the hormone cortisol when you feel really overwhelmed with stress, and mindfulness can help to manage that reaction.

“Over 18,000 studies have supported the use of meditation as one of the best daily habits for improving mental health and reducing cortisol to manage stress,” Ashbrook explains. And as a result, she adds, stress management can contribute to other physical and mental health benefits, like better sleep, better focus, etc.

IT ALLOWS YOU TO CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONAL RESPONSES

According to licensed clinical social worker Melissa Ifill, mindfulness can help you gain a better understanding of what you’re thinking, what you’re feeling, and how you’re behaving, which in turn allows for a greater ability to manage emotions and reactions overall.

“This heightened awareness gives us the tools to be able to address these patterns of thought, feelings, and behaviors in ways that can positively impact our mood and our functioning,” she tells Elite Daily.

PRACTICING MINDFULNESS CAN ACTUALLY LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

“Practicing mindfulness balances the autonomic nervous system, which naturally lowers blood pressure,” Dr. Dora Wolfe, a licensed clinical psychologist and clinical director of Wolfe Behavioral Health, tells Elite Daily.

And indeed, a scientific review published in the International Journal of Hypertension showed that practicing transcendental meditation is linked to reduced blood pressure in people who have hypertension. Not a bad reason to give it a try, right?

IT ALSO CALMS YOUR HEART RATE

You know when you get upset about something and your heart feels like it’s going to rapidly rocket out of your chest? It’s one of the worst feelings, for sure, but according to Lillian Daniels, wellness expert and founder of The Happy Knee, practicing mindfulness might be able to help, as it can calm and slow your heart rate.

“[Mindful] practices, such as breathing exercises, actually can calm your heart rate, even in a highly stressful situation,” Daniels tells Elite Daily.

MINDFULNESS MIGHT HELP TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BODY IMAGE

Anything that encourages you to think more positively about your body is worth trying, IMO, and science says mindfulness can help with this, too. In a recent study, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in England recruited 646 British adults between 18 and 76 years old and asked them to complete a handful of different questionnaires, one of which focused on their bodily awareness, while the rest focused on things like body image, body appreciation, and self-consciousness.

The results, which have been published in the academic journal Body Image, revealed a connection between a person’s ability to read their body’s internal signals (such as hunger or emotional discomfort) and their body image. Basically, the researchers found that the greater the person’s bodily awareness, the more positive they felt overall about their body. And while the study’s press release noted that more research is needed to confirm these findings, lead study author Jenny Todd said in a statement, “This could have implications for promoting positive body image, for example modifying interoceptive awareness through mindfulness-based practices.”

 

Fonte – Elite Daily

 

Read more...

Large

Combinar meditação com exercício físico melhora a saúde do cérebro

Já é bem conhecido que uma forma eficaz de levar os benefícios da meditação e de mindfulness para nosso dia a dia é através da atividade física, ou seja, praticando exercícios com atenção plena ou consciência nas sensações corporais e nos movimentos em si. Assim, o próprio exercício físico vira uma forma de “meditação”.

Alguns estudos já demonstraram que isso é possível, ou seja, que os exercícios físicos regulares também melhoram os níveis de mindfulness desde que feitos com atenção plena (evitando-se as distrações durante o exercício, como por exemplo, ler ou
conversar), melhorando, além do condicionamento físico, a concentração e a saúde mental.

A novidade é que nos últimos anos também tem sido testado cientificamente a inclusão de meditação e exercício na mesma sessão, combinando na sequência de um mesmo treinamento, práticas de meditação do tipo mindfulness (conheça algumas técnicas de
mindfulness clicando aqui) e exercícios físicos aeróbios. Em geral, começa-se com 30 minutos de meditação, e se finaliza com mais 30 minutos de atividade física de intensidade moderada, num treino de 1 hora no total.

Os resultados são muito positivos, inclusive para o cérebro: melhora da aptidão física, menos sintomas de ansiedade e depressão, menos ruminação mental (aqueles pensamentos repetitivos e autodepreciativos), melhor manejo de traumas psicológicos, e
respostas neuropsicológicas mais saudáveis (medidas por testes objetivos). O interessante é que esses resultados foram superiores quando comparados com praticar apenas meditação ou apenas atividade física.

Assim, da próxima vez que praticar exercícios ou esportes, lembre-se da possibilidade de levar mindfulness às essas atividades, ou melhor, de praticar as duas coisas de forma integrada, ampliando seus resultados.

Vamos praticar?

Referências:

– Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723891

– MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26836414

Para saber mais:

www.mindfulnessbrasil.com (Mente Aberta – Centro Brasileiro de Mindfulness e Promoção da Saúde – UNIFESP)

www.goamra.org (American Mindfulness Research Association, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

www.umassmed.edu/cfm (Centro de Meditação “Mindfulness” na Medicina, Universidade de Massachusetts, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

 

 

Fonte – Dr. Marcelo Demarzo

Read more...

Here’s How Mindfulness Affect Your Body, Especially In Times Of Stress, According To Experts

How many times has it been suggested that you start a mindfulness practice? For me, I’d say I’m cresting a million times, but that doesn’t mean I’ve actually dipped my feet into the practice just yet. Maybe you’re sick of hearing about it yourself, but when you really think about how mindfulness can affect your body, it’s pretty incredible. So even if you consider yourself to be a bit of a skeptic about these things, hear me out, because experts say the practice does live up to the hype.

When people talk about mindfulness, the focus is usually on things like quieting your mind, relieving stress, and turning negative thoughts into positive ones. And yes, mindfulness can help you achieve those things, but according to spiritual teacher and meditation guide, Biet Simkin, the practice is also a way to recognize what she calls “the ultimate truth.” She tells Elite Daily in an email, “[Mindfulness] makes you remember who you are and what your purpose is on this planet.” In other words, practicing mindfulness is essentially a way to practice being your most natural, authentic self, without any distractions or influences from the outside world. It helps you get in touch with who you really are.

If the skeptic in you has suddenly grown to be a bit more curious, here are a few other fascinating ways mindfulness affects your body.

IT CAN HELP REDUCE ANXIETY IN REAL TIME

“Mindfulness is one of the best tools for eliminating real-time anxiety and physical stress responses,” Kristen Rice, a behavioral health coach, meditation teacher, and energy healer, tells Elite Daily. “Anxiety exists when our fight-or-flight stress response is triggered when thinking about the past or the future.”

Most of the time, Rice explains, these perceived “threats” that your body is picking up on when you feel anxious aren’t actually real, or at least, they don’t warrant such an intense physiological response. So really, that response only serves to make you feel more overwhelmed, rather than actually solve anything.

That’s where mindfulness comes in, according to Rice. “When paired with mindful breathing, the physical results are extremely powerful because, with slow, deep breathing into the belly, you experience biofeedback between the mind and body,” she explains. “Your breath slows, and as a result, your body communicates back to the parasympathetic nervous system that you are safe, allowing both your mind and body to calm, slow, and turn off the alarms.”

MINDFULNESS CAN CURTAIL YOUR BODY’S STRESS RESPONSE

One of the major benefits of meditation is stress management, yoga teacher, author, and speaker Jodi Ashbrook, tells Elite Daily. She explains that your brain releases the hormone cortisol when you feel really overwhelmed with stress, and mindfulness can help to manage that reaction.

“Over 18,000 studies have supported the use of meditation as one of the best daily habits for improving mental health and reducing cortisol to manage stress,” Ashbrook explains. And as a result, she adds, stress management can contribute to other physical and mental health benefits, like better sleep, better focus, etc.

IT ALLOWS YOU TO CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONAL RESPONSES

According to licensed clinical social worker Melissa Ifill, mindfulness can help you gain a better understanding of what you’re thinking, what you’re feeling, and how you’re behaving, which in turn allows for a greater ability to manage emotions and reactions overall.

“This heightened awareness gives us the tools to be able to address these patterns of thought, feelings, and behaviors in ways that can positively impact our mood and our functioning,” she tells Elite Daily.

PRACTICING MINDFULNESS CAN ACTUALLY LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

“Practicing mindfulness balances the autonomic nervous system, which naturally lowers blood pressure,” Dr. Dora Wolfe, a licensed clinical psychologist and clinical director of Wolfe Behavioral Health, tells Elite Daily.

And indeed, a scientific review published in the International Journal of Hypertension showed that practicing transcendental meditation is linked to reduced blood pressure in people who have hypertension. Not a bad reason to give it a try, right?

IT ALSO CALMS YOUR HEART RATE

You know when you get upset about something and your heart feels like it’s going to rapidly rocket out of your chest? It’s one of the worst feelings, for sure, but according to Lillian Daniels, wellness expert and founder of The Happy Knee, practicing mindfulness might be able to help, as it can calm and slow your heart rate.

“[Mindful] practices, such as breathing exercises, actually can calm your heart rate, even in a highly stressful situation,” Daniels tells Elite Daily.

MINDFULNESS MIGHT HELP TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BODY IMAGE

Anything that encourages you to think more positively about your body is worth trying, IMO, and science says mindfulness can help with this, too. In a recent study, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in England recruited 646 British adults between 18 and 76 years old and asked them to complete a handful of different questionnaires, one of which focused on their bodily awareness, while the rest focused on things like body image, body appreciation, and self-consciousness.

The results, which have been published in the academic journal Body Image, revealed a connection between a person’s ability to read their body’s internal signals (such as hunger or emotional discomfort) and their body image. Basically, the researchers found that the greater the person’s bodily awareness, the more positive they felt overall about their body. And while the study’s press release noted that more research is needed to confirm these findings, lead study author Jenny Todd said in a statement, “This could have implications for promoting positive body image, for example modifying interoceptive awareness through mindfulness-based practices.”

 

Fonte – Elite Daily

 

Read more...

Large Alt

Combinar meditação com exercício físico melhora a saúde do cérebro

Já é bem conhecido que uma forma eficaz de levar os benefícios da meditação e de mindfulness para nosso dia a dia é através da atividade física, ou seja, praticando exercícios com atenção plena ou consciência nas sensações corporais e nos movimentos em si. Assim, o próprio exercício físico vira uma forma de “meditação”.

Alguns estudos já demonstraram que isso é possível, ou seja, que os exercícios físicos regulares também melhoram os níveis de mindfulness desde que feitos com atenção plena (evitando-se as distrações durante o exercício, como por exemplo, ler ou
conversar), melhorando, além do condicionamento físico, a concentração e a saúde mental.

A novidade é que nos últimos anos também tem sido testado cientificamente a inclusão de meditação e exercício na mesma sessão, combinando na sequência de um mesmo treinamento, práticas de meditação do tipo mindfulness (conheça algumas técnicas de
mindfulness clicando aqui) e exercícios físicos aeróbios. Em geral, começa-se com 30 minutos de meditação, e se finaliza com mais 30 minutos de atividade física de intensidade moderada, num treino de 1 hora no total.

Os resultados são muito positivos, inclusive para o cérebro: melhora da aptidão física, menos sintomas de ansiedade e depressão, menos ruminação mental (aqueles pensamentos repetitivos e autodepreciativos), melhor manejo de traumas psicológicos, e
respostas neuropsicológicas mais saudáveis (medidas por testes objetivos). O interessante é que esses resultados foram superiores quando comparados com praticar apenas meditação ou apenas atividade física.

Assim, da próxima vez que praticar exercícios ou esportes, lembre-se da possibilidade de levar mindfulness às essas atividades, ou melhor, de praticar as duas coisas de forma integrada, ampliando seus resultados.

Vamos praticar?

Referências:

– Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723891

– MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26836414

Para saber mais:

www.mindfulnessbrasil.com (Mente Aberta – Centro Brasileiro de Mindfulness e Promoção da Saúde – UNIFESP)

www.goamra.org (American Mindfulness Research Association, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

www.umassmed.edu/cfm (Centro de Meditação “Mindfulness” na Medicina, Universidade de Massachusetts, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

 

 

Fonte – Dr. Marcelo Demarzo

Read more...

Here’s How Mindfulness Affect Your Body, Especially In Times Of Stress, According To Experts

How many times has it been suggested that you start a mindfulness practice? For me, I’d say I’m cresting a million times, but that doesn’t mean I’ve actually dipped my feet into the practice just yet. Maybe you’re sick of hearing about it yourself, but when you really think about how mindfulness can affect your body, it’s pretty incredible. So even if you consider yourself to be a bit of a skeptic about these things, hear me out, because experts say the practice does live up to the hype.

When people talk about mindfulness, the focus is usually on things like quieting your mind, relieving stress, and turning negative thoughts into positive ones. And yes, mindfulness can help you achieve those things, but according to spiritual teacher and meditation guide, Biet Simkin, the practice is also a way to recognize what she calls “the ultimate truth.” She tells Elite Daily in an email, “[Mindfulness] makes you remember who you are and what your purpose is on this planet.” In other words, practicing mindfulness is essentially a way to practice being your most natural, authentic self, without any distractions or influences from the outside world. It helps you get in touch with who you really are.

If the skeptic in you has suddenly grown to be a bit more curious, here are a few other fascinating ways mindfulness affects your body.

IT CAN HELP REDUCE ANXIETY IN REAL TIME

“Mindfulness is one of the best tools for eliminating real-time anxiety and physical stress responses,” Kristen Rice, a behavioral health coach, meditation teacher, and energy healer, tells Elite Daily. “Anxiety exists when our fight-or-flight stress response is triggered when thinking about the past or the future.”

Most of the time, Rice explains, these perceived “threats” that your body is picking up on when you feel anxious aren’t actually real, or at least, they don’t warrant such an intense physiological response. So really, that response only serves to make you feel more overwhelmed, rather than actually solve anything.

That’s where mindfulness comes in, according to Rice. “When paired with mindful breathing, the physical results are extremely powerful because, with slow, deep breathing into the belly, you experience biofeedback between the mind and body,” she explains. “Your breath slows, and as a result, your body communicates back to the parasympathetic nervous system that you are safe, allowing both your mind and body to calm, slow, and turn off the alarms.”

MINDFULNESS CAN CURTAIL YOUR BODY’S STRESS RESPONSE

One of the major benefits of meditation is stress management, yoga teacher, author, and speaker Jodi Ashbrook, tells Elite Daily. She explains that your brain releases the hormone cortisol when you feel really overwhelmed with stress, and mindfulness can help to manage that reaction.

“Over 18,000 studies have supported the use of meditation as one of the best daily habits for improving mental health and reducing cortisol to manage stress,” Ashbrook explains. And as a result, she adds, stress management can contribute to other physical and mental health benefits, like better sleep, better focus, etc.

IT ALLOWS YOU TO CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONAL RESPONSES

According to licensed clinical social worker Melissa Ifill, mindfulness can help you gain a better understanding of what you’re thinking, what you’re feeling, and how you’re behaving, which in turn allows for a greater ability to manage emotions and reactions overall.

“This heightened awareness gives us the tools to be able to address these patterns of thought, feelings, and behaviors in ways that can positively impact our mood and our functioning,” she tells Elite Daily.

PRACTICING MINDFULNESS CAN ACTUALLY LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

“Practicing mindfulness balances the autonomic nervous system, which naturally lowers blood pressure,” Dr. Dora Wolfe, a licensed clinical psychologist and clinical director of Wolfe Behavioral Health, tells Elite Daily.

And indeed, a scientific review published in the International Journal of Hypertension showed that practicing transcendental meditation is linked to reduced blood pressure in people who have hypertension. Not a bad reason to give it a try, right?

IT ALSO CALMS YOUR HEART RATE

You know when you get upset about something and your heart feels like it’s going to rapidly rocket out of your chest? It’s one of the worst feelings, for sure, but according to Lillian Daniels, wellness expert and founder of The Happy Knee, practicing mindfulness might be able to help, as it can calm and slow your heart rate.

“[Mindful] practices, such as breathing exercises, actually can calm your heart rate, even in a highly stressful situation,” Daniels tells Elite Daily.

MINDFULNESS MIGHT HELP TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BODY IMAGE

Anything that encourages you to think more positively about your body is worth trying, IMO, and science says mindfulness can help with this, too. In a recent study, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in England recruited 646 British adults between 18 and 76 years old and asked them to complete a handful of different questionnaires, one of which focused on their bodily awareness, while the rest focused on things like body image, body appreciation, and self-consciousness.

The results, which have been published in the academic journal Body Image, revealed a connection between a person’s ability to read their body’s internal signals (such as hunger or emotional discomfort) and their body image. Basically, the researchers found that the greater the person’s bodily awareness, the more positive they felt overall about their body. And while the study’s press release noted that more research is needed to confirm these findings, lead study author Jenny Todd said in a statement, “This could have implications for promoting positive body image, for example modifying interoceptive awareness through mindfulness-based practices.”

 

Fonte – Elite Daily

 

Read more...

Full

Combinar meditação com exercício físico melhora a saúde do cérebro

Já é bem conhecido que uma forma eficaz de levar os benefícios da meditação e de mindfulness para nosso dia a dia é através da atividade física, ou seja, praticando exercícios com atenção plena ou consciência nas sensações corporais e nos movimentos em si. Assim, o próprio exercício físico vira uma forma de “meditação”.

Alguns estudos já demonstraram que isso é possível, ou seja, que os exercícios físicos regulares também melhoram os níveis de mindfulness desde que feitos com atenção plena (evitando-se as distrações durante o exercício, como por exemplo, ler ou
conversar), melhorando, além do condicionamento físico, a concentração e a saúde mental.

A novidade é que nos últimos anos também tem sido testado cientificamente a inclusão de meditação e exercício na mesma sessão, combinando na sequência de um mesmo treinamento, práticas de meditação do tipo mindfulness (conheça algumas técnicas de
mindfulness clicando aqui) e exercícios físicos aeróbios. Em geral, começa-se com 30 minutos de meditação, e se finaliza com mais 30 minutos de atividade física de intensidade moderada, num treino de 1 hora no total.

Os resultados são muito positivos, inclusive para o cérebro: melhora da aptidão física, menos sintomas de ansiedade e depressão, menos ruminação mental (aqueles pensamentos repetitivos e autodepreciativos), melhor manejo de traumas psicológicos, e
respostas neuropsicológicas mais saudáveis (medidas por testes objetivos). O interessante é que esses resultados foram superiores quando comparados com praticar apenas meditação ou apenas atividade física.

Assim, da próxima vez que praticar exercícios ou esportes, lembre-se da possibilidade de levar mindfulness às essas atividades, ou melhor, de praticar as duas coisas de forma integrada, ampliando seus resultados.

Vamos praticar?

Referências:

– Mindfulness may both moderate and mediate the effect of physical fitness on cardiovascular responses to stress: a speculative hypothesis. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24723891

– MAP training: combining meditation and aerobic exercise reduces depression and rumination while enhancing synchronized brain activity. Acessível em https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26836414

Para saber mais:

www.mindfulnessbrasil.com (Mente Aberta – Centro Brasileiro de Mindfulness e Promoção da Saúde – UNIFESP)

www.goamra.org (American Mindfulness Research Association, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

www.umassmed.edu/cfm (Centro de Meditação “Mindfulness” na Medicina, Universidade de Massachusetts, Estados Unidos, informações em inglês)

 

 

Fonte – Dr. Marcelo Demarzo

Read more...

Here’s How Mindfulness Affect Your Body, Especially In Times Of Stress, According To Experts

How many times has it been suggested that you start a mindfulness practice? For me, I’d say I’m cresting a million times, but that doesn’t mean I’ve actually dipped my feet into the practice just yet. Maybe you’re sick of hearing about it yourself, but when you really think about how mindfulness can affect your body, it’s pretty incredible. So even if you consider yourself to be a bit of a skeptic about these things, hear me out, because experts say the practice does live up to the hype.

When people talk about mindfulness, the focus is usually on things like quieting your mind, relieving stress, and turning negative thoughts into positive ones. And yes, mindfulness can help you achieve those things, but according to spiritual teacher and meditation guide, Biet Simkin, the practice is also a way to recognize what she calls “the ultimate truth.” She tells Elite Daily in an email, “[Mindfulness] makes you remember who you are and what your purpose is on this planet.” In other words, practicing mindfulness is essentially a way to practice being your most natural, authentic self, without any distractions or influences from the outside world. It helps you get in touch with who you really are.

If the skeptic in you has suddenly grown to be a bit more curious, here are a few other fascinating ways mindfulness affects your body.

IT CAN HELP REDUCE ANXIETY IN REAL TIME

“Mindfulness is one of the best tools for eliminating real-time anxiety and physical stress responses,” Kristen Rice, a behavioral health coach, meditation teacher, and energy healer, tells Elite Daily. “Anxiety exists when our fight-or-flight stress response is triggered when thinking about the past or the future.”

Most of the time, Rice explains, these perceived “threats” that your body is picking up on when you feel anxious aren’t actually real, or at least, they don’t warrant such an intense physiological response. So really, that response only serves to make you feel more overwhelmed, rather than actually solve anything.

That’s where mindfulness comes in, according to Rice. “When paired with mindful breathing, the physical results are extremely powerful because, with slow, deep breathing into the belly, you experience biofeedback between the mind and body,” she explains. “Your breath slows, and as a result, your body communicates back to the parasympathetic nervous system that you are safe, allowing both your mind and body to calm, slow, and turn off the alarms.”

MINDFULNESS CAN CURTAIL YOUR BODY’S STRESS RESPONSE

One of the major benefits of meditation is stress management, yoga teacher, author, and speaker Jodi Ashbrook, tells Elite Daily. She explains that your brain releases the hormone cortisol when you feel really overwhelmed with stress, and mindfulness can help to manage that reaction.

“Over 18,000 studies have supported the use of meditation as one of the best daily habits for improving mental health and reducing cortisol to manage stress,” Ashbrook explains. And as a result, she adds, stress management can contribute to other physical and mental health benefits, like better sleep, better focus, etc.

IT ALLOWS YOU TO CONTROL YOUR EMOTIONAL RESPONSES

According to licensed clinical social worker Melissa Ifill, mindfulness can help you gain a better understanding of what you’re thinking, what you’re feeling, and how you’re behaving, which in turn allows for a greater ability to manage emotions and reactions overall.

“This heightened awareness gives us the tools to be able to address these patterns of thought, feelings, and behaviors in ways that can positively impact our mood and our functioning,” she tells Elite Daily.

PRACTICING MINDFULNESS CAN ACTUALLY LOWER YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE

“Practicing mindfulness balances the autonomic nervous system, which naturally lowers blood pressure,” Dr. Dora Wolfe, a licensed clinical psychologist and clinical director of Wolfe Behavioral Health, tells Elite Daily.

And indeed, a scientific review published in the International Journal of Hypertension showed that practicing transcendental meditation is linked to reduced blood pressure in people who have hypertension. Not a bad reason to give it a try, right?

IT ALSO CALMS YOUR HEART RATE

You know when you get upset about something and your heart feels like it’s going to rapidly rocket out of your chest? It’s one of the worst feelings, for sure, but according to Lillian Daniels, wellness expert and founder of The Happy Knee, practicing mindfulness might be able to help, as it can calm and slow your heart rate.

“[Mindful] practices, such as breathing exercises, actually can calm your heart rate, even in a highly stressful situation,” Daniels tells Elite Daily.

MINDFULNESS MIGHT HELP TO PROMOTE POSITIVE BODY IMAGE

Anything that encourages you to think more positively about your body is worth trying, IMO, and science says mindfulness can help with this, too. In a recent study, researchers from Anglia Ruskin University in England recruited 646 British adults between 18 and 76 years old and asked them to complete a handful of different questionnaires, one of which focused on their bodily awareness, while the rest focused on things like body image, body appreciation, and self-consciousness.

The results, which have been published in the academic journal Body Image, revealed a connection between a person’s ability to read their body’s internal signals (such as hunger or emotional discomfort) and their body image. Basically, the researchers found that the greater the person’s bodily awareness, the more positive they felt overall about their body. And while the study’s press release noted that more research is needed to confirm these findings, lead study author Jenny Todd said in a statement, “This could have implications for promoting positive body image, for example modifying interoceptive awareness through mindfulness-based practices.”

 

Fonte – Elite Daily

 

Read more...